Are you paying a ‘Liquidity Premium’?

Two investments with the same credit risk profile, potential for upside performance, tax treatment and expected investment period should have the same expected return.

Right?

Not in the real world. We know two very similar investment profiles can be priced very different. Why is that? For many deals, it boils down to liquidity.

Pricing differences in two seemingly similar investment options are often due to the investor’s ability to easily buy and sell the investment — the measure of how “liquid” it is.

Liquidity has been a hot topic lately.  Investors typically pay a significant premium to be in liquid investments such as blue chip stocks and U.S. Treasurys. Is it worth it?

Sure, investors can easily sell a liquid investment. However, on days when the market plummets, many investors lack the stomach to sell. Others sell in fear, regretting their quick exit later. On those days, the premium paid for a liquid investment may not feel like it paid off.

A recent article pointed out that sovereign wealth funds and other large institutional pools focused on long-term wealth creation have seen their allocations to illiquid alternative assets perform better over the long-term investment horizon, compared to more liquid holdings, according to research by Patrick Thomson, global head of Sovereigns at JPMorgan Asset Management.

Thompson says investing with a long-term view of alternative assets can help investors exploit tactical opportunities created by short-term investors forced to liquidate holdings, benefit from mispricing and valuation errors, and take advantage of their capacity to absorb additional risk.

“These advantages have rarely mattered more than now in a capital market environment of low yields, mounting volatility, unexciting global economic growth and subpar investment returns — nor have they contrasted more sharply with the prevailing transaction-oriented mentality,” Thompson writes in FTSE Global Markets.

“Yet today, as much as ever, long-term investors can (and should) access the full range of long-term non-public assets — value-added real estate, infrastructure, private equity and private debt — to diversify their holdings, mute the volatility of the public markets and earn steady and favorable risk-adjusted returns.”

The emergence of real estate investment offerings via online investment platforms makes this method of investing more accessible than ever. The average accredited investor can now follow similar strategies as those sovereign wealth funds.

On days when the public markets are fluctuating (or halting altogether), that a feels like good place to be.


Nikki Baldonieri

By Nikki Vasco | Chief Investment Officer | FullCapitalStack